Just Suppose SOLS #2 2012




I’m not typically a huge fan of Dr. Seuss books. I think for early readers they are pretty challenging and don’t offer much in the area of comprehension skills. But today I took a moment to look at his work through different eyes, and to listen through different ears. Just like many other states we are fast approaching the implementation of the common core. I have been looking through them and trying my best to become familiar with what will be asked of my first graders. I am excited about its implementation, but some in my school are not.
Today as I read “If I Ran the Circus” I mentally made note of the way I could use this story in the coming year. The opportunities for writing, phonics, vocabulary and of course rhyming words were abundant. As I read “One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish” my mind began to swirl once again- rhyming words, nonsense words, fluency, and spelling, on and on.
And then the whole of it hit me. It’s not as much about its implementation, or the fact that some of us are happy about it, and some of us are not. It’s the stepping away from the normal, our preconceived notions, and the old behaviors. It’s taking time to look at things differently just for a moment, asking and wondering “just suppose” and then showing our kids how to do the same. It’s this that is going to make Dr. Seuss and the Common Core work for us (me), our kids, our classrooms, and our schools.
I think I’ll work on a Super Seuss Unit to start the year with next year!

On a personal note I hope all of my blogging friends and your families are ok after the terrible storms the past few days. We here in Oklahoma know how devastating severe storms can be.   Keep Safe. 





Photobucket

15 comments:

  1. Very true. I think it is also important to listen and watch through the students' eyes...the books are just plain fun to listen to and to look at- which is important, too, for early learners on so many levels. =)
    Jennifer

    First Grade Blue SKies

    ReplyDelete
  2. I'm so excited to see that you are finally coming to your senses about the value of the Dr. Seuss books!!!! I didn't ever think I would see the day! lol

    I hope you survived without me today! Enjoy your weekend.



    First Grade Delight
    imgoingfirst@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  3. I think your blog is lovely, so I've given you an award. Come see if you'd like. :)
    ❀ Tammy
    Forever in First

    ReplyDelete
  4. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I taught first grade for many years. I usually started with a Dr. Seuss unit, not because he is my favorite author, but because HOP ON POP was the first book that I can remember knowing how to read. Love how you linked Seuss to Common Core. I'm still trying to get my head around them and you have given me a new lens to peer through! Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  6. I agree with you completely.
    Tricia

    ReplyDelete
  7. I teach 3rd grade in Indiana, and our dreaded standardized test (ISTEP) is next week. So, today I managed to use some of Dr. Seuss' books and quotes to pump the kids up for ISTEP testing. MY favorite was "And will you succeed? Yes! You will indeed! 98 and 3/4 percent guaranteed!" It's amazing how he can weave his way into our lives still.

    ReplyDelete
  8. As a mother, Seuss and I have a love/hate relationship. My son LOVED Hop on Pop. We must have read it a zillion times. I thought that if I had to listen to it again, I may scream! As a teacher, I had a reluctant reader one year who read "Ten Apples up on Top" as her very first without-any-help book. For the look in her eyes, I love Seuss.....
    Lori@
    bee-the-change.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  9. Great post! You are right-makes you think! Look forward to reading your daily posts this month!

    Laura
    Peace, Love, and First Grade

    ReplyDelete
  10. Tammy, love the "a-ha" moment you had today. I, too, am not a huge fan of Dr. Seuss but the kids love his creativity and ingenuity! However, your connection to the CCSS is spot on. They are coming and things will look and feel different, but is that so wrong? Thanks for the insights!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hi Tammy, I'm glad the storms didn't affect you, BTW. I like the thinking in your post. We don't deal with the common core at my school so I don't quite understand what you mean. Is Dr. Seuss a required part of it in some way? Just asking to see what you think. I love his stories for somewhat older kids for sure.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I love reading about people who understand the idea of changing old behaviors and looking at things differently. I feel like my entire professional life I have been evolving, and CC will be one of the next evolutions. Great slice!

    Hope you stay safe as well.

    ReplyDelete
  13. What a great perspective on his work! I have to remind myself to take a step back and look at things in a different light in the classroom as well.

    I always enjoy reading your blog and nominated you for a reward. Be sure to stop by to accept it. :)
    Deb
    Simply the Classroom

    ReplyDelete
  14. Glad eveyone is ok after those storms. I Like how you captured your reflective moment here. That's what makes good teaching!

    ReplyDelete
  15. I totally agree with your comments about Dr. Seuss books.

    I just found your blog through Lil' Country Kindergarten. I can't wait to look around a bit.

    I'd love it if you'd come over to my blogs as well. I currently have three blogs. I write a home blog (my most widely read blog), a literacy blog, and a kindergarten blog. My literacy and kindergarten blogs are fairly new, so I'd love to get the word out about them. My main website is www.homeiswheremystorybegins.com. From there, you can get to all of my blogs. I'd love any advice you have for breaking into the teaching blog world. I feel like I have a pretty good start with my home blog, but no one seems to be reading my other two. Any suggestions for me would be GREATLY appreciated!

    Thanks for taking the time to help out a new teacher-blogger!

    Becca

    ReplyDelete

LinkWithin